December 20, 2017

What Your Hair & Scalp Say About Your Health

Does Bad Hair Mean Bad Health?

Is your hair trying to tell you something about your health? Maybe. Some circumstances and medications affect your body as well as your hair. In other cases, you may just need to take better care of your hair or scalp.

Does Bad Hair Mean Bad Health?

Is your hair trying to tell you something about your health? Maybe. Some conditions and medications affect your body as well as your hair. In other cases, you may just need to take better care of your hair or scalp. Use this pictorial guide to see what separates myth from fact when it comes to your health and your hair.

White Flakes Pose No Health Risk

Dandruff isn’t communicable. So how do you get it? Doctors aren’t sure, but one theory is that it may be due to an overgrowth of a fungus. Other possible risk factors include oily skin, stress, obesity, cold, dry weather, and having eczema or psoriasis. Although it’s awkward — and the itching can be irritating — dandruff isn’t harmful.

 

Tips for Dandruff Treatment

To reduce the buildup of dandruff’s dead skin cells, try using an antidandruff shampoo daily. Leave shampoo on for 5 minutes, then rinse thoroughly. You may require trying several dandruff shampoos to find one that works best for you. If one stops working, try another. If that doesn’t help, consult a doctor.

You May Shed More Than You Think

It’s not a perfect measure, but some experts predict that we may shed up to 100 or more hairs per day. That does not cause the warning, nor does it mean you’re going bald. About 90% of your 100,000 hair follicles are producing hair at any given time. The other 10% are in a resting (telogen) phase, and the hair falls out after about 2 to 3 months. It’s replaced by the new hair and the growth cycle repeats.

 

An Attack on Hair Follicles

In alopecia areata, your immune system falsely attacks hair follicles, resulting hair to fall out — often suddenly. Most people will have one or two bald patches, which can be treated easily with injections but in some cases, all body hair falls out. Alopecia areata isn’t harmful or communicable, but it can be tough psychologically. Hair may grow back on its own, and treatment may help it grow back more quickly. Unfortunately, some people may experience alopecia areata repeatedly.

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